Clamming.

Roccus7

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Dec 22, 2018
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Anyone read that article? WhereTF are the clams in Cordwood Landing County Park? Unless Skimmer Clams have made a resurgence in the Sound, there ain't no other clams anywhere but in the harbors, at least not by 1980s standards. You folks actually getting hardshells in the Sound now??
 

Chinacat

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Dec 20, 2018
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Anyone read that article? WhereTF are the clams in Cordwood Landing County Park? Unless Skimmer Clams have made a resurgence in the Sound, there ain't no other clams anywhere but in the harbors, at least not by 1980s standards. You folks actually getting hardshells in the Sound now??
No clue
Not me 'cuz I'm on South Shore in the greater Shinnecock area
I laugh when I see others say there ain't any clams left yet I come back to the dock with plenty every time I go:)
 

Roccus7

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No clue
Not me 'cuz I'm on South Shore in the greater Shinnecock area
I laugh when I see others say there ain't any clams left yet I come back to the dock with plenty every time I go:)
I got you one better. A fellow Long Island expatriate who lives in Portsmouth, NH kept telling me, the LI boy of Italian American descent who dug clams there for over 20 year, that I couldn't possibly be digging hard shell clams where I live because he couldn't find any in the marshes of Portsmouth which means I'm also too far North.

After bombarding him with photos like this, today's luncheon raw bar, guess who asked which days to come up in Feb to dig?

1579209137673.png
 

Capt13

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Dec 28, 2018
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Clams in the news :

East Coast Hard Clam Selective Breeding Collaborative Project
This project — a $1.2 million collaborative effort with NYSG and Stony Brook University along with Cornell University, Rutgers University and the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences — will apply selective breeding to improve the resilience of hard clam stocks cultured across the Atlantic seaboard. Bassem Allam, Marinetics Endowed Professor at Stony Brook University is lead PI on this project, which also includes shellfish biologists and geneticists, Sea Grant and Cornell Cooperative Extension specialists, and industry partners located in five states (Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Virginia) where there is significant hard clam aquaculture.



Other Projects
In addition to federal funding awarded to the East Coast marine research projects, NYSG is also part of a three-year, $1 million multi-state Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative project designed to help Great Lakes States respond to consumer demand for freshwater fish and address the $14 billion national seafood trade deficit identified by the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service.

For more information on the 42 research projects and collaborative programs supported, see the National Sea Grant College Program announcement.



 

Chinacat

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Dec 20, 2018
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Looks Awesome Roccus!!!!
Are those ones all the same or am I gotta guess which one is different from the others??? LOL

I'm jealous and foaming at the mouth!

My brother has been wanting to go to his "winter spot" in Moriches and I'm thinking it's time to give him a call and tag along!! (y)
 
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fishfanatic1

New Angler
Dec 30, 2019
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Nassau,Oyster Bay
I got you one better. A fellow Long Island expatriate who lives in Portsmouth, NH kept telling me, the LI boy of Italian American descent who dug clams there for over 20 year, that I couldn't possibly be digging hard shell clams where I live because he couldn't find any in the marshes of Portsmouth which means I'm also too far North.

After bombarding him with photos like this, today's luncheon raw bar, guess who asked which days to come up in Feb to dig?

View attachment 14760
Errrrsterrs n clhams.
 
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Roccus7

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Dec 22, 2018
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Looks Awesome Roccus!!!!
Are those ones all the same or am I gotta guess which one is different from the others??? LOL

I'm jealous and foaming at the mouth!

My brother has been wanting to go to his "winter spot" in Moriches and I'm thinking it's time to give him a call and tag along!! (y)
No quiz today, all Crassostrea viginica!!
 

Roccus7

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Dec 22, 2018
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They are a Virginia strain ?
No, all Eastern oysters are the Virginica species, probably because the taxonomist who described it got the first specimens from Virginia, not that the species originated there. This is my hunch based on the fact that it was classified in 1791 by German Naturalist Johann Gmelin and I doubt he had any family members named "Virginia".

Time for Roccus Useless Facts:
Biologists have much "Artistic Freedom" in naming species, far less than Genus on up. I once worked with a sea gull eye parasitic worm named Philopthalmus hegenerii, the species named for a Paul Hegner who let the scientists work in the tide pools on is property examining the water for the larval stages of sea gull parasites.

Biologist also get to show their sense of humor/elan when naming other things. One of my favorites was "Sirenen", the first reproduction-associated pheromone discovered, named after the Sirens that lured Odysseus and his crew to their island."

Unfortunately chemists don't get much freedom. A sugar expert professor of mine told me a sad tale of the naming of a newly discovered sugar in the early 20th century. Everyone agreed that it was a new sugar, but the testing equipment at the time didn't allow them to pin down the exact structure of the molecule. The discoverer wanted to name it "Godknose", but that was shot down, a terrible tragedy IMHO...
 
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BoatGuy

New Angler
Feb 8, 2019
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I'm finding this quite interesting

In my teens and early 20's I was a commercial clammer- admittedly part time in the summer months but I was a treader. No rake, just my feet. Spent many days of my youth jumping off a boat and clamming that way as well digging "piss clams" by hand in the mud on flats
To this day I still do it the same way with only my hands and feet so I'm kinda caught between being interested in how to do it with "tools" and thinking I don't need no stinking tools cause I still do fine with my 50+ year old feet and hands
View attachment 14735View attachment 14736
I used to do it that way. But more than once some broken glass ruined my day. Now I use a rake.
 

Mbg75

New Angler
Apr 2, 2019
24
9
3
Mt Sinai
Anyone do any winter clamming. Most of my shore bound spots open Oct 1st. Been really hitting it good. Filling my allotment with ease. Steamers n razor clams is my main target. I get an occasional hardshell but usually they are in a different area.
I have dug hardshells. Never, steamers and razors. Do you just use a pitchfork and that clam gun?
 
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fishfanatic1

New Angler
Dec 30, 2019
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Nassau,Oyster Bay
I have dug hardshells. Never, steamers and razors. Do you just use a pitchfork and that clam gun?
I used to just use my hands and rarely a pitchfork or shovel. Found it broke too many and a lot more WORK than just digging with my hands. Now with the clam gun. i pretty much stay clean and can fill a pail in half the time.
 
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