New Cod Recovery Plan

Roccus7

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Have to find exactly what the "Fishcrats" are proposing, stay tuned...

Regulators announce plan to rebuild long lost cod stock by 2033​

pressherald.com/2023/01/05/regulators-announce-fishing-plan-to-rebuild-long-lost-cod-stock-by-2033/

By PATRICK WHITTLE January 5, 2023

Federal ocean regulators say a new fishing plan has a chance to rebuild the New England cod stock, which is a goal even many commercial fishermen have long regarded as far-fetched.

Atlantic cod were once a cornerstone of the New England economy, but the catch has plummeted after years of overfishing, environmental changes and restrictive quotas. Most of the cod sold in the U.S. comes from overseas because many American fishermen avoid the fish-and-chips staple altogether.

Cod Recovery Plan

An Atlantic cod swims in an aquarium at the Musee du Fjord in Saguenay, Quebec, Canada in July 2022. Federal authorities have announced an ambitious plan to rebuild the collapsed Atlantic cod stock. Robert F. Bukaty, Associated Press, file

But the New England Fishery Management Council has approved a new strategy that it said has a 70% chance of rebuilding the stock by 2033. The proposal, which is awaiting final approval from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, would use 10 years of low catch limits to try to rebuild the cod population in the Gulf of Maine.

The council said in a statement that the new plan will lower the fishing mortality rate for the fish over the next decade to “offer more protection for Gulf of Maine cod and give the stock a better chance of rebuilding.” But some fishermen are unconvinced cod are ever coming back.

Fishermen have grown used to choking quotas on cod catch and have moved on to other species, said Terry Alexander, a longtime fishermen from Harpswell who targets haddock and monkfish these days.

“I would like to have my codfish back, for sure. We could make some money on them. But that’s never going to happen,” Alexander said. “Codfish is a dead issue with me because we’re never going to get them back. If they were jumping out of the water at the dock, we wouldn’t get them back.”

U.S. fishermen caught more than 100 million pounds of cod per year in the early 1980s, but that number fell to about 1.3 million in 2021 – the lowest haul in recorded history.

The vast majority of codfish that still comes to the docks in the U.S. does so in Massachusetts. Tens of thousands of pounds of the fish also come to land in Maine and New Hampshire. Foreign catch from countries such as Iceland and Norway dominates the U.S. market.

Environmentalists have pushed for regulators to take a new approach to save the cod stock because of the historic nature of the cod-fishing industry and the fish’s importance to ocean ecosystems. The council’s new plan has a higher chance of success than previous efforts, said Allison Lorenc, senior policy analyst with Conservation Law Foundation.

“This new plan will reduce fishing pressure to help cod recover while supporting fishing communities. Our hope is that this is the first of many decisions that will set cod on a path to a healthy population,” Lorenc said.

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Roccus7

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More "Fluff" still haven't found the source document...

December 14, 2022

New England council’s new cod rebuilding plan


843e9486def53efba37372cfe7446e59.jpg

The New England Fishery Management Council's new rebuilding plan for Gulf of Maine cod has a 10-year timeline out to 2033. NOAA photo.

Anew 10-year rebuilding plan for Gulf of Maine cod has a 70 percent probability of rebuilding the beleaguered stock by 2033, according to the New England Fishery Management Council’s latest changes to Northeast groundfish management.

Under Framework 65 to the rebuilding plan, the strategy is to set a fishing mortality rate at 60 percent what would produce maximum sustainable yield, and low fishing mortality that will force low annual catch limits during the 10-year rebuilding period, according to a summary from the council after its Dec. 5-8 meeting in Newport, R.I.

The acceptable biological catch for cod of 551 metric tons already in place for the 2023 and 2024 fishing years will not change under the rebuilding plan. But the plan calls for tighter accountability measures to ensure any catch overages are paid back

“Under the existing accountability measures, a pound-for-pound payback is applied to the commercial fishery when overages occur – even if commercial vessels are not the cause of the overage,” according to the council.

“If approved by NOAA Fisheries, the temporary modification would be in place if accountability measures are applied to 2023-2025 annual catch limits, after which the AMs (accountability measures) would revert to the current approach. The modification includes a mechanism for the commercial fishery’s pound-for-pound payback to be reduced if all catch from U.S. fisheries is below the total ACL (allowable catch limit) during the year following the overage.”

Framework 65 is the latest effort in more than 20 years of the council’s efforts to rebuild cod. In 2020 the Conservation Law Foundation petitioned the Department of Commerce seeking to force an end to all directed cod fishing in the region, arguing all management efforts had failed.

“The Atlantic cod population is struggling, and this vote is finally a step in the right direction,” said Allison Lorenc, senior policy analyst at CLF, in a statement from the group after the council’s action. “After two failed attempts, this new plan will reduce fishing pressure to help cod recover while supporting fishing communities. Our hope is that this is the first of many decisions that will set cod on a path to a healthy population.”
 
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Roccus7

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And a true Shakespearian "Much Ado About Nothing", at least in reference to cod. No significant changes to GOM Cod both commercially and recreationally, BUT Georges Bank commercial cod take INCREASED (???) by 54% in FY 2023???

Haddock catches really clamped down, GOM DECREASED ~84% for all fisheries, including recreational.

There's tons of other fish involved, and scallops, but I'll leave that reading to those of you interested.

My overall impression of this, in reference to cod is, "LOOK AT US!! We're doing something!!" to fend off the environmentals and future litigation by them...
 
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Old Mud

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Thanks for the update bud. Yeah, don't try to figure it out. I know many fishermen who can't figure it out. My thoughts are only the formally educated folks have all the answers. I much enjoyed that last pic. of those 8 1/2 bushels of Georges Yellowtails. All which are no bigger than the palm of your hand. A trawler wouldn't bother setting his gear for that take. Perhaps none of our younger folks have never seen a little older pictures of what an adult Yellow use to look like. ?

Anyway, not trying to kill the messenger here just a couple of facts about my faith in people sitting at a desk trying to control the ocean.
 

OVERBORED

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So I guess by default they are admitting that Magnusson-Stevens was a failure. It certainly prevented overfishing but as far as restoring stocks................
 

Roccus7

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So I guess by default they are admitting that Magnusson-Stevens was a failure. It certainly prevented overfishing but as far as restoring stocks................
Wish it was that simple, it's more that the current recommendations made under Magnusson-Stevens with their poor probabilities didn't work so they have to up the probability factor. The past history of fishery management is that a 50% probability is "good enough" and that's slowly changing. My favorite ploy at any of these meetings is to ask the different management councils if they'd bet their 401(k) on a 50% chance of success. Suddenly everyone starts "tying their loafers"...

If the 70% probability fails, then we're looking at at total Atlantic Cod fishery moratorium, with "collateral damage"; banning fishing, rec or commercial, in areas that "might" have cod, even if you're targeting other fish.
 
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Roccus7

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So I guess by default they are admitting that Magnusson-Stevens was a failure. It certainly prevented overfishing but as far as restoring stocks................
Here's something interesting I just came upon that further clarifies/muddies my comments above...

National Standard 1, included in the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) states that “Conservation and management measures shall prevent overfishing while achieving, on a continuing basis, the optimum yield from each fishery for the United States fishing industry. [emphasis added]”

In 2000, a federal appellate court interpreted that language in Natural Resources Defense Fund v. Daley. It found that, in order to pass legal muster, a fishery management measure must have at least a 50% probability of preventing overfishing, and observed that “Only in Superman Comics’ Bizarro world, where reality is turned upside down, could the [National Marine Fisheries] Service reasonably conclude that a measure that is at least four times as likely to fail as succeed offers a ‘fairly high level of confidence'” that overfishing will not occur.
 
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MakoMike

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Here's something interesting I just came upon that further clarifies/muddies my comments above...

National Standard 1, included in the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) states that “Conservation and management measures shall prevent overfishing while achieving, on a continuing basis, the optimum yield from each fishery for the United States fishing industry. [emphasis added]”

In 2000, a federal appellate court interpreted that language in Natural Resources Defense Fund v. Daley. It found that, in order to pass legal muster, a fishery management measure must have at least a 50% probability of preventing overfishing, and observed that “Only in Superman Comics’ Bizarro world, where reality is turned upside down, could the [National Marine Fisheries] Service reasonably conclude that a measure that is at least four times as likely to fail as succeed offers a ‘fairly high level of confidence'” that overfishing will not occur.
Old news, that case is what? 20 years old? Current cod management is really screwed up, in that, the council is still dealing with cod as if there are only two stocks, i.e. GOM and George's bank, while the "best available science" says there're five separate and distinct stocks. Its going to take a while before everyone gets their ducks in a row.
 

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