New Mercury V12, 600Hp

Leprechaun

Kind of a Big Deal - In My Mind Anyway
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Dec 19, 2018
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Supposedly 2x600hp get 20% better fuel economy than 4x400hp and give the same cruise and WOT speeds. Might even be less to purchase up front too. Who knows?

Can’t even imagine being in the middle of such a decision. Blows my mind.
 
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Leprechaun

Kind of a Big Deal - In My Mind Anyway
Staff member
Dec 19, 2018
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Yeah, I think we're about to get into the ""torque vs horsepower" discussion that takes over every hotrod board I've ever read - all of which discussions go absolutely nowhere. . . but do manage to burn up plenty of bandwidth.
 
I grew up running outboard powered boats from my first 16' aluminum center console to my 24' Grady which was my second to last vessel before moving on to my current Albin 28 some 18 years ago. There is no doubt that the current level of engineering and performance in today's state of the art Outboard is light years ahead of the old "beaters" I was running in the 70's and 80's. However, with all these new goodies does come the greater potential that when something breaks down ( and they all inevitably do) it's going to cost a small fortune to repair, as Lep mentioned.

Another observation is that for all the improvements in fuel economy, a straight inboard, in most cases, will still burn less fuel for a given load and speed. Case in point is an article I just read in the current edition of Soundings. Now this comparison was for a luxury Downeast style cruiser, the Back Cove. The comparison done was between a Back Cove 37 powered by a traditional 600hp Cummins Diesel vs the new Back Cove 390 with triple Verado 400 HP outboards. Both boats were tested at a 24 kt. cruising speed and the diesel obtained 1.24nm/gal while the outboards only got 0.6 nm/gal. When you factor in an average price difference of about 50 cents a gallon more for gas that's a pretty big difference in cost of operation, just to be able to gain a little more top speed if you really want to pour the fuel down the drain quickly. Obviously, the outboard version does have a lot more storage space without the engine room needed for the inboard. Since I don't expect to win the lottery anytime soon this is kind of moot but interesting to me, at least.

What I still can never wrap my head around is the amazing "love affair" so many in the fishing game seem to have with outboard powered vessels, whether center consoles or pilot house designs. I never understood why folks would want to sacrifice practically all of their fishing space off the stern with those giant propulsion plants blocking your way. IMHO once you add a bracket mounted system with a full transom you have essentially negated any simple way to fish off of your stern.

Can't wait to hear from all the outboard lovers about how wrong I am!!:)
 

Roccus7

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Dec 22, 2018
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What I still can never wrap my head around is the amazing "love affair" so many in the fishing game seem to have with outboard powered vessels, whether center consoles or pilot house designs. I never understood why folks would want to sacrifice practically all of their fishing space off the stern with those giant propulsion plants blocking your way. IMHO once you add a bracket mounted system with a full transom you have essentially negated any simple way to fish off of your stern.

Can't wait to hear from all the outboard lovers about how wrong I am!!:)

Wow someone got a bug in his bonnet this AM, that being myself, but I've got to rant...

I'll take "Friend of the Court" position Captain Mike, that of someone who's locked into low 20' boats with the necessity of outboard propulsion, due to the fact that the boat will lie on mud a few low tides a month. Please don't even suggest an I/O which is, without a doubt, the worst of both the Inboard and Outboard worlds...

The worse sin that caused loss of fishing space on outboard vessels was the "European Transom" that popped up in the 90s. I not so fondly refer to this abomination as the "Eurotrashsom", a sad loss of fishing space. I have one of the almost extinct boat design with a cockpit that goes all the way to a non-welled transom with a single engine bolted on. Besides the space advantages, which are paramount, it also allows use of the "Transom Head" for those of us endowed with "outboard plumbing" of non-epic dimensions and drink a few coffees before heading out in the AM... ;););)

Here's another thing that I thought I'd never say, and that is I "miss" the walk through cabin design. This has been the stalwart design of the family boat for years, Dad's fishing boat and Mom's Sunday Cruise vessel. I have no use for it, but now that it's gone, the Nobel Laureates that design boats have morphed the classic CC design into the family boat to fill the vacuum. There's nothing wrong with that, but now on many CCs they've taken away the bow casting platform, a paramount need on a CC IMO, and replaced it with built-in thwart lounge chaises for Mom!! WTF? Add in a Eurotrashsom and you've now taken a fine, roomy fishing vessel with a worthless party barge!!

Couldn't agree more with you on the new fascination with multiple, huge engines bolted on a transom. As I mentioned somewhere above, there are a lot of our colleagues who must have some real need to compensate for them. From a practical sea conditions perspective, just how many days can one actually open all them engines up and let the ponies run without jarring loose dental work and making jelly out of our kidneys?? Seems like an awful waste of money to try to impress your friends. In my simplistic, frugal mind, the only reason for a maximum of DUAL engines is for those of us who routinely make offshore runs of more than 25 nm one way, e.g. those who make frequent Canyon runs. Four engines to take SWAMBO out for a Sunday cruise? Seriously???

And then there are the operating costs. A good diesel does need proper maintenance, but the cost of doing it on a single engine compared to three or more of the new high tech outboards is miniscule. Will be interesting when these new boat owners, who probably got the 1st year's winterization bill covered in their purchase agreements, get their yard bills next year!! That "reality check", along with the reality check for first time boat owners due to COVID-19 impulse buying, should have the now-depleted used boat market explode come spring 2022.

Unfortunately, you couldn't even give me most of the impulse purchased boats, so I'll stick with my current one which suits me just fine, putting over 150 hrs on per year with only feeding her 200 - 225 gallons of gas, which I ferry in with Jerry jugs. Yeah, I can't get her over 28 kts., but then again, these old bones can no longer weather a high RPM jarring in anything less than glass-like surface conditions, and the mi$er in me $ee$ no rea$on for pu$hing the throttle pa$t 20 kt$. To each his own...

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OVERBORED

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Jan 6, 2021
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Think about getting to the dip in 1.5hrs..........fishing the afternoon bite, overnight and the morning bite and being home before 12. 24hrs tops

Same trip on a downeaster is at least 36hrs.

It allows a guy with limited time to get in on a bite regardless of how far he needs to go.

Down south where long runs are the norm its popular.

I did it once.....not for me. I got beat up. The fish were practically unsellable.......disaster!
 

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