Proposed New Inlet

Avenger

Angler
Jan 29, 2019
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Well, yes and mostly no. But if they do, can they put a gate in the new inlet that Sandy knocked thru also?

Everybody is marveling at how clean the water is because of the new inlet. What they don't get is that the bay acts as a buffer for storm surge (and a few other things as well) and all that clean water will be mud when it's in their living rooms because the flooding will be much worse without the restriction that less inlets provide.
 

Jack_Daniels

New Angler
Dec 21, 2018
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Well, yes and mostly no. But if they do, can they put a gate in the new inlet that Sandy knocked thru also?

Everybody is marveling at how clean the water is because of the new inlet. What they don't get is that the bay acts as a buffer for storm surge (and a few other things as well) and all that clean water will be mud when it's in their living rooms because the flooding will be much worse without the restriction that less inlets provide.
That is not true. The new inlet was was actually found to have punched through from the bayside out to the ocean, due to the flooding that occurred in the bay. It was a relief valve for the flooding caused by Sandy. Since it's creation, there's been no rise in sea level on the bayside due to it.
 

Jack_Daniels

New Angler
Dec 21, 2018
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Sounds like a silly "pipe dream!" 😄

This keeps coming up, and is be all for an actual inlet, but what kind of appreciable volume of water is a pipe going to provide for flushing? Old (New) Inlet is more than a 500' wide and a few feet deep. What pipe would come close to that in volume?

And w how dynamic the ocean shoreline is, what is to keep the pipe ocean entrance from getting buried in the constantly shifting sand?
 

Avenger

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Jan 29, 2019
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That is not true. The new inlet was was actually found to have punched through from the bayside out to the ocean, due to the flooding that occurred in the bay. It was a relief valve for the flooding caused by Sandy. Since it's creation, there's been no rise in sea level on the bayside due to it.

Maybe not the average, but the high tides are higher, and the lows are lower and much more frequently. We never had such a large range on a regular basis before.

I do agree that a properly managed gate system would be beneficial and would be a much better investment of the taxpayer's money than raising individual houses. But that doesn't buy individual votes.
 
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Jack_Daniels

New Angler
Dec 21, 2018
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Maybe not the average, but the high tides are higher, and the lows are lower and much more frequently. We never had such a large range on a regular basis before.

I do agree that a properly managed gate system would be beneficial and would be a much better investment of the taxpayer's money than raising individual houses. But that doesn't buy individual votes.
Avenger,

They have been studying the change in tides, and have found the same to be occurring in New Jersey. The new Old Inlet clearly doesn't have anything to do with waterlevels in NJ. What they believe to be the cause is that the Gulf Stream has been slowing down. When it was running faster, it would suck some of the water out of the New York Bite with it, but as it's slowing more of that water is remaining here.

I believe this slowing of the Gulf Stream is also responsible for why we do not see the large eddies spinning off the GS and coming into the NY bite anymore, and instead now, we typically only see weakly connected filaments of GS water. The water on the edge of the continental shelf is warmer than ever, but it is not always the clean blue GS water, and instead, more turbid shelf water. Chlorophyll charts are more important then ever now to find that clean GS water.

I think the changing ocean currents also helps explain some of the wildly changing weather patterns we're seeing. There was a movie years ago, Day After Tomorrow, which discussed this, but in a Hollywood dramatized manner. While it was on a rediculously rapid scale in the movie, it was based on some scientific facts I had learned out in an oceanography class many years ago. Weather is largely controlled by ocean currents. When the currents change so does the weather. In this case, it's becoming unstable. Superstorms, Polar Vortexes, More tropical storms than ever in recorded history, Snow in Las Vegas, drought in other areas. . .

The earth is warming. That will cause ice caps to melt and flood the dry areas. All that water will then cool the climate and start the next ice age. That's the cycle that has played out multiple times in the earth's long history, long before humans existed.
 

Avenger

Angler
Jan 29, 2019
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That's fine, and I don't dispute your points. I can only tell you what I know from 50+ years of personal observation.

And that is that the tide ranges changed the day after Hurricane Sandy. It's not long term climatic changes in the gulf stream, or "climate change". Everything I'm talking about changed in one day and stayed that way. When Isaias went by we started seeing a tidal event similar to Sandy, with rapidly rising water levels at low tide. If the timing had been worse, we would have had another catastrophic flooding event, and that was a much smaller storm that passed well to the west of the island.

I've seen several hurricanes on the South shore of LI and the flooding was all of similar magnitude until Sandy. Now we have a much greater tidal swing and I promise we will not have that cushion like we used to. Everyone goes on about how clean the water is, but when it's in their living room I promise it will not be clean.
 
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