Mothballs

Jack_Daniels

New Angler
Dec 21, 2018
24
23
3
Hmmmm….getting an education here. OK, if not mothballs, can I an alternative be recommended. I have seen the damage mice and others can do.
Boatguy,

There are many products, natural and synthesized, labeled for critter repellents. Some products contain similar ingredients to moth balls even, they're just labeled for the use. I just searched on Amazon for raccoon repellents and found a bunch of options.
 

Jack_Daniels

New Angler
Dec 21, 2018
24
23
3
I've only seen Doggies on me, but incidence of Lyme, Babesiousis and Anaplasmosis up here is going through the roof. Highly unusual for anyone with a dog to never had a problem with the puppy having Lyme at least once; most have had multiple infections in spite of proper tick treatment, collars. And just about everyone landscaper I know has had Lyme, as well as 2 neighbors who never took my warnings to heart prior to both of them getting Lyme...

The Admiral contracted Lyme once down in CT so we're extremely aggressive, read that TOTALLY ANAL, in our "Tick Prevention" stance. If I go out in areas of my property I haven't treated, or visiting the "Nursery In The Woods Across The Street" for white pine or white birch saplings to transplant, I "gown up" in my permethrin-treated clothes, pants tucked into socks, Malathon treatment of entry points, wrists, neck, waste and ankles, and an extra layer of Deep Woods Off around my boots, socks and pants before heading out.
That's interesting. Must be the cooler and damper climate up there that allows the dog ticks to proliferate in mowed lawns. In our area, they would tend to desiccate, which is why they're most often found in tall grasses instead, where they can avoid drying out. Dog ticks carry Rocky mountain fever, babesiosis, erlichiosis.

Deer ticks are the ones that carry lyme, plus the other dog tick diseases

Lone star ticks are our latest plague. They aren't as prone to desiccation, so they will inhabit mowed lawn areas. They're fast and will quest much further for a host. The nastiest part of them is the larval balls they have in late summer/ early fall. You can walk through hundreds/ thousands of larvae and they attack like chiggers. Besides, the dog tick diseases, they carry STARI which is like Lyme, but there's no test for it. Their saliva also can cause an allergic reaction to red meat.

.
 
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george

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That's interesting. Must be the cooler and damper climate up there that allows the dog ticks to proliferate in mowed lawns. In our area, they would tend to desiccate, which is why they're most often found in tall grasses instead, where they can avoid drying out. Dog ticks carry Rocky mountain fever, babesiosis, erlichiosis.

Deer ticks are the ones that carry lyme, plus the other dog tick diseases

Lone star ticks are our latest plague. They aren't as prone to desiccation, so they will inhabit mowed lawn areas. They're fast and will quest much further for a host. The nastiest part of them is the larval balls they have in late summer/ early fall. You can walk through hundreds/ thousands of larvae and they attack like chiggers. Besides, the dog tick diseases, they carry STARI which is like Lyme, but there's no test for it. Their saliva also can cause an allergic reaction to red meat.

.
You certainly know more than just balls! But Lyme is no joking matter.
 

george

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Dec 19, 2018
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6 NYCRR 325.2(b) requires pesticides to be used ONLY in accordance with label directions.

Moth balls aren't labeled for critter repellant in a boat.
Well you certainly know your balls very well.

The chemicals in mothballs are toxic to humans and pets. People are exposed to the chemicals in mothballs by inhaling the fumes. If you smell mothballs, you are being exposed to these chemicals. Children or pets sometimes mistake mothballs for food or candy and eat them, which can cause serious effects.
Some of the chemicals in mothballs can cause reversible health effects that include headaches, nausea, eye and nose irritation and coughing. Exposure to naphthalene can cause more serious effects, including hemolytic anemia. Naphthalene is also a possible carcinogen. Extended exposure to mothballs can also cause liver and kidney damage.
 
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