Whats going on in the World

movetheboat

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Dec 29, 2018
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RLMFAO!

If you want to make this about politics, look at 80% of the prison population that is made up of minorities, constituents of the right, that are commiting the most violent of crimes on a daily basis and while we're at it let's talk about the liberals who voted for bail reform which is also known as the guaranteed repeat offender bill.

How's that working out?
two different things....both have truth
 

OVERBORED

Angler
Jan 6, 2021
983
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two different things....both have truth
We make a big deal with mass shootings as well we should. It's tragic.
What's also tragic is an 11yr old girl killed yesterday from a stray bullet.
Crime is out of control. Police are frustrated with the system. Fund the crap out of the police! Give them more power. Bring back stop and frisk.
I'm not offended. I'm glad the be stopped.
Something needs to change.
 

movetheboat

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Dec 29, 2018
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Mississippi is the fattest place in America: Magnolia state, West Virginia and Alabama lead America's health crisis with 40% of people obese, report shows​

  • Telephone surveys revealed these states had the highest self-reported obesity rates across the country
  • Experts blamed poor diets, less access to public spaces for exercise and health insurance for the crisis
  • America is the fattest country in the western world with two in five adults estimated to be obese
IF THOSE FAT BASTIDS TRY TO SECEDE AGAIN WE WILL KICK THEIR FAT ASSES
 

Roccus7

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Dec 22, 2018
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Midcoast Maine

On a Russian talk show, a retired colonel stuns his colleagues by pointing out that the invasion isn’t going well.​

A military analyst on one of Russian state television’s most popular networks left his fellow panelists in stunned silence on Monday when he said that the conflict in Ukraine was deteriorating for Russia, giving the kind of honest assessment that is virtually banished from the official airwaves.

“The situation for us will clearly get worse,” Mikhail M. Khodaryonok, a retired colonel and a conservative columnist on military affairs, said during the “60 Minutes” talk-show program on the Rossiya network.

It was a rare moment of frank analysis in a country where criticizing the war effort can result in a prison sentence and broadcasters have generally adhered to the Kremlin’s talking points.

The problems that Mr. Khodaryonok referred to, sometimes obliquely, included low morale, the array of Western countries aligned against Russia and the amount of fighters and matériel that Ukraine was assembling.

“We are in total geopolitical isolation and the whole world is against us, even if we don’t want to admit it,” said Mr. Khodaryonok, noting that Russia’s “resources, military-political and military-technical, are limited.”

He urged Russians not to take “informational sedatives.” The clip was first highlighted by Francis Scarr of BBC Monitoring, which tracks Russian broadcasts. Mr. Khodaryonok did not immediately respond to a request for further comment.

Aside from questioning Russia’s position, it was a remarkable moment because Mr. Khodaryonok noted that Ukraine seemed to have momentum. Russians mistakenly tended to try to extrapolate the problems of a few soldiers in the Ukrainian Army to denigrate its whole military, he said. In reality, they were ready to field a million men if given sufficient weapons, were highly motivated and would be receiving an increasing quantity of military support from the United States and Europe, he added.

News talk shows in Russia are generally a shouting match, with the half dozen panelists each vying to drown out the others. On this episode, however, the other panelists stood in stunned silence. Only Olga Skabeyeva, the host, who religiously follows the Kremlin line, interrupted with official talking points in sometimes tense exchanges.

She attempted to point out that support from China and India was just as good as support from Europe, that perhaps professional soldiers were superior to conscripts and that Russia “had no choice,” the standard Kremlin justification for its invasion by presenting Ukraine as a threat.

Mr. Khodaryonok seemed to be careful not to say anything openly critical of the Russian side, repeatedly stressing that the entire situation was “not normal.” When it came to morale issues, for example, he reached back into history and noted that Marx and Lenin had said that high morale was an important factor for battlefield success. He did not refer directly to recent indications that the Russian Army is suffering from morale problems.

In March, Russia criminalized denouncing its war effort, including even referring to it as a war rather than a “special military operation.”

Mr. Khodaryonok has been critical of the Russian military operations in the past. In an unusual column published in early February, before the invasion, he cautioned against it, saying that it would not be the cake walk that many Russian analysts expected and that it was not in Russia’s “national interests.”

He predicted accurately that the Ukrainians would fight hard to defend their country and that the West would provide extensive arms. “There will be no blitzkrieg in Ukraine,” he wrote in Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, a Russian weekly newspaper supplement on military matters.

Even earlier, about a year after Russia dispatched its military to Syria in 2015 to prop up President Bashar al-Assad, he wrote a column for an internet news service, Gazeta.Ru, suggesting that the Syrian Army was an unworthy ally, pointing out its lack of military success and corruption.

Concerning the war in Ukraine, however, he has previously praised the Russian effort.

In comments on his Telegram channel posted only a week ago, he said that military theorists for years to come would study the special operation as something “unique.” He said Russian advances in the eastern Donbas region were due to the discipline, training, morale of its military, as well as the effectiveness of its artillery. He also repeated the unfounded Russian claim that the Ukrainian side fostered Nazis.
 

wader

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Dec 22, 2018
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Onancock, Virginia

On a Russian talk show, a retired colonel stuns his colleagues by pointing out that the invasion isn’t going well.​

A military analyst on one of Russian state television’s most popular networks left his fellow panelists in stunned silence on Monday when he said that the conflict in Ukraine was deteriorating for Russia, giving the kind of honest assessment that is virtually banished from the official airwaves.

“The situation for us will clearly get worse,” Mikhail M. Khodaryonok, a retired colonel and a conservative columnist on military affairs, said during the “60 Minutes” talk-show program on the Rossiya network.

It was a rare moment of frank analysis in a country where criticizing the war effort can result in a prison sentence and broadcasters have generally adhered to the Kremlin’s talking points.

The problems that Mr. Khodaryonok referred to, sometimes obliquely, included low morale, the array of Western countries aligned against Russia and the amount of fighters and matériel that Ukraine was assembling.

“We are in total geopolitical isolation and the whole world is against us, even if we don’t want to admit it,” said Mr. Khodaryonok, noting that Russia’s “resources, military-political and military-technical, are limited.”

He urged Russians not to take “informational sedatives.” The clip was first highlighted by Francis Scarr of BBC Monitoring, which tracks Russian broadcasts. Mr. Khodaryonok did not immediately respond to a request for further comment.

Aside from questioning Russia’s position, it was a remarkable moment because Mr. Khodaryonok noted that Ukraine seemed to have momentum. Russians mistakenly tended to try to extrapolate the problems of a few soldiers in the Ukrainian Army to denigrate its whole military, he said. In reality, they were ready to field a million men if given sufficient weapons, were highly motivated and would be receiving an increasing quantity of military support from the United States and Europe, he added.

News talk shows in Russia are generally a shouting match, with the half dozen panelists each vying to drown out the others. On this episode, however, the other panelists stood in stunned silence. Only Olga Skabeyeva, the host, who religiously follows the Kremlin line, interrupted with official talking points in sometimes tense exchanges.

She attempted to point out that support from China and India was just as good as support from Europe, that perhaps professional soldiers were superior to conscripts and that Russia “had no choice,” the standard Kremlin justification for its invasion by presenting Ukraine as a threat.

Mr. Khodaryonok seemed to be careful not to say anything openly critical of the Russian side, repeatedly stressing that the entire situation was “not normal.” When it came to morale issues, for example, he reached back into history and noted that Marx and Lenin had said that high morale was an important factor for battlefield success. He did not refer directly to recent indications that the Russian Army is suffering from morale problems.

In March, Russia criminalized denouncing its war effort, including even referring to it as a war rather than a “special military operation.”

Mr. Khodaryonok has been critical of the Russian military operations in the past. In an unusual column published in early February, before the invasion, he cautioned against it, saying that it would not be the cake walk that many Russian analysts expected and that it was not in Russia’s “national interests.”

He predicted accurately that the Ukrainians would fight hard to defend their country and that the West would provide extensive arms. “There will be no blitzkrieg in Ukraine,” he wrote in Nezavisimoye Voyennoye Obozreniye, a Russian weekly newspaper supplement on military matters.

Even earlier, about a year after Russia dispatched its military to Syria in 2015 to prop up President Bashar al-Assad, he wrote a column for an internet news service, Gazeta.Ru, suggesting that the Syrian Army was an unworthy ally, pointing out its lack of military success and corruption.

Concerning the war in Ukraine, however, he has previously praised the Russian effort.

In comments on his Telegram channel posted only a week ago, he said that military theorists for years to come would study the special operation as something “unique.” He said Russian advances in the eastern Donbas region were due to the discipline, training, morale of its military, as well as the effectiveness of its artillery. He also repeated the unfounded Russian claim that the Ukrainian side fostered Nazis.
and he hasn't been seen since........................

:)
 

dsedy

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Jan 31, 2019
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LOl. if you look at the Russian Ruble, or the income they are getting from oil and natural gas since the invasion... and how they have Europe by the nuts...I would suggest it is going exactly according to plan. Their plan...not Nato's ...Or FJB


Chess vs Checkers boys
 
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dsedy

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Ruble vs USD
And for those who can't follow along...the Ruble is rising cause Russia is making Europe and APAC pay for Oil and Nat Gas in Rubbles...So those countries have to sell/swap their currency, buy Rubles, and Buy commodities from Russia.

So much for sanctions...
 

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wader

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Associated Press

NATO chief hails 'historic moment' as Finland, Sweden apply​


BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said Wednesday that the military alliance stands ready to seize a historic moment and move quickly on allowing Finland and Sweden to join its ranks, after the two countries submitted their membership requests.

The official applications, handed over by Finland and Sweden’s ambassadors to NATO, set a security clock ticking. Russia, whose war on Ukraine spurred them to join the military organization, has warned that it wouldn't welcome such a move, and could respond.

“I warmly welcome the requests by Finland and Sweden to join NATO. You are our closest partners,“ Stoltenberg said. “All allies agree on the importance of NATO enlargement. We all agree that we must stand together, and we all agree that this is an historic moment which we must seize.”

“This is a good day at a critical moment for our security,” a beaming Stoltenberg said, as he stood alongside the two envoys, with NATO, Finnish and Swedish flags at their backs.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has demanded that the alliance stop expanding toward Russia's borders, and several NATO allies, led by the United States and Britain, have signaled that they stand ready to provide security support to Finland and Sweden should the Kremlin try to provoke or destabilize them during the time it takes to become full members.

The countries will only benefit from NATO's Article 5 security guarantee — the part of the alliance's founding treaty that pledges that any attack on one member would be considered an attack of them all — once the membership ratification process is concluded, probably in a few months.


The move is one of the biggest geopolitical ramifications of the war and will rewrite Europe’s security map. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson welcomed it in a tweet and said that “Putin’s appalling ambitions have transformed the geopolitical contours of our continent.”
 
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wader

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Dec 22, 2018
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LONDON (Reuters) -Russia on Wednesday said it was using a new generation of powerful laser weapons in Ukraine to burn up drones, deploying some of Moscow's secret weapons to counter a flood of Western arms supplied to its former Soviet neighbour.

President Vladimir Putin in 2018 unveiled an array of new weapons including a new intercontinental ballistic missile, underwater nuclear drones, a supersonic weapon and a new laser weapon.

Little is known about the specifics of the new laser weapons. Putin mentioned one called Peresvet, named after a medieval Orthodox warrior monk Alexander Peresvet who perished in mortal combat.

Yury Borisov, the deputy prime minister in charge of military development, told a conference in Moscow that Peresvet was already being widely deployed and it could blind satellites up to 1,500 km above Earth.

He said, though, that there were already more powerful Russian systems than Peresvet that could burn up drones and other equipment. Borisov cited a test on Tuesday which he said had burned up a drone 5 km away within five seconds.

"If Peresvet blinds, then the new generation of laser weapons lead to the physical destruction of the target - thermal destruction, they burn up," Borisov told Russian state television.
================
more at the link

If this is true & they actually work - this could send this whole fiasco in a whole other direction. What if they star attempting to "blind" US satellites to prevent the US/Britain from intelligence sharing with Ukrainian forces?
 
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wader

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Ukrayinska Pravda
Wed, May 18, 2022, 6:13 AM


VALENTYNA ROMANENKO – WEDNESDAY, 18 MAY 2022, 16:13
The Russian invaders do not hesitate to shoot civilians trying to escape the temporarily occupied territories.

Source: new telephone conversations between occupying forces’ troops, intercepted by the Security Service of Ukraine
Quote from aggressor: "They have nowhere to go now, they try to pass by at night. We are murdering them. I do not feel sorry for them, even for the peaceful population. Anyone who wanted to leave already done it. So, we don’t care and we murder them".

Barbarians........
 
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wader

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  • Putin often became frustrated with Trump over his lack of knowledge on big issues, Fiona Hill said.
  • "He had to keep explaining things, and Putin doesn't like to do that," Hill said.
  • Hill said this factored into Putin's decision to invade Ukraine during the Biden administration.
Russian President Vladimir Putin often became frustrated with President Donald Trump over his lack of knowledge on geopolitical issues, Fiona Hill said, adding that this played into Moscow's decision on the timing of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

One of the reasons Putin invaded Ukraine with President Joe Biden in the White House was that he expected the US to "sue for peace" and thought it would be better to deal with Biden than trying to negotiate with someone like Trump, whom the Russian leader had "to explain everything to all the time," Hill, who served as the top Russia advisor on the National Security Council under Trump, said Tuesday at a Chicago Council on Global Affairs event.
 

movetheboat

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Dec 29, 2018
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Monkeypox is now spotted in Italy and Sweden — bringing number of countries with confirmed or suspected cases to SEVEN​

  • Italian patient tested positive in Rome after returning from the Canary Islands
  • UK, US, Spain and Portugal have confirmed cases and Canada is probing several
  • Experts fear known cases tip of iceberg because most patients not connected
By CONNOR BOYD DEPUTY HEALTH EDITOR FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 09:02 EDT, 19 May 2022 | UPDATED: 10:09 EDT, 19 May 2022
 
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